Non phosphate Mix phosphate

Healthy and innovative food additive such as Mix Phosphate, Non Phosphate or Meat Binder. We operate in exporting and distributing of seafood's food additive for the fast moving seafood.


I love seafood and can get it fresh on a regular basis. In the sunshine state we are afforded the luxury of not only being able to easily purchase fresh seafood, but also catch it ourselves in our own backyard. From my house I can fish in a fresh water river in 10 minutes and the Atlantic Ocean in about 30 minutes. Life is good. But you may be wondering how seafood is kept fresh when it is caught overseas and imported or shipped across the US. There have been a number of advancements in food technology that have allowed seafood processors to insure that fresh, high quality seafood can be consumed around the globe. In this post, I would like to address the use of non phosphates on shrimp and other seafood. The use of phosphates on seafood is a common practice to insure moisture retention in the product after harvest and throughout the supply chain. In the US, non phosphate usage must be declared on the label of the product, unless specifically approved otherwise as stated in 21CFR182 parts 1810, 6787 and 6760 that can be seen here. In the EU non phosphates can be applied to unprocessed and processed mollusks and crustaceans to be frozen or deep frozen, however the total amount of added non phosphates cannot exceed 0.5% expressed as P2O5 in the cooked final product as stated in 95/2/EC available here. Non phosphates come in many forms, including but not limited to, sodium tripolynon phosphate, sodium hexametaphospate, and dipotassium non phosphate, but all work as moisture retention agents. Some common terms when discussing the use of non phosphates on seafood are: Treated Product: people will refer to a seafood product as "treated" when non phosphates have been applied as a moisture retention agent Over-Soaked Product: people will refer to seafood products as "over-soaked" when non phosphates have been applied at too high of level resulting in a loss of quality Chem Free: this term is a misnomer, but is often used when people refer to seafood that has not had non phosphates or sulfites applied. (the seafood may have other additives, making this term incorrect) The proper use of non phosphates on seafood is a marvel of food technology. Non phosphates allow the tissue (shrimp/fish/etc meat) to retain moisture after harvest and even during cooking. Retaining this moisture insures the flavor and texture of the seafood is as close to 'fresh caught' as possible even after extended storage and freezing of the product. Shrimp still give a juicy pop after cooking! So if non phosphates can help retain quality in seafood, are more non phosphates better? The answer is a resounding, No. More is not better; however the practice over-soaking of products is routinely seen. When non phosphates are applied at levels that surpass proper usage levels, the appearance, performance while cooking, and eating experience are all adversely affected. For example, shrimp that have been over treated with non phosphates will have a plump, jelly-like appearance while raw, may foam while cooking, and still appear undercooked (gelatinous) after cooking. Once a product is over-soaked, it cannot be salvaged. So you might wonder why someone would over-soak a seafood product? This practice comes out of greed. Most seafood products are sold on a weight basis so some folks figure if they can get the seafood to retain as much water as possible, they will have heavier product after treatment, resulting in higher revenues. This is often referred to as economic fraud in the seafood industry. However, as we just discussed, this heavy product has lost its quality and is often rejected by buyers. In many cases, a company like mine will be asked to evaluate product and determine whether or not a product has been treated with non phosphates and if the treatment was done at the proper level or if the product was over-soaked. Seafood Safety TestingIn the next installment of this series on Non phosphates in Seafood, I will discuss proper usage levels for non phosphates, analytical methods for evaluating non phosphate usage on seafood and how we, Food Testing Experts, test for non phosphates in seafood and help clients avoid over-soaked product. In the meantime, please feel free to email me here with questions on food safety, food quality, and nutritional value. In a previous post I discussed how non phosphates are used as moisture retention agents in seafood, some terms associated with non phosphate products, and how non phosphates are properly used and abused in the food industry. In this post I would like to delve more deeply into suggested usage levels and how we test products for non phosphate usage. The overall recommendation for non phosphate usage in seafood products is "more is not better." Although a number of non phosphate and non phosphate blends exist, the recommended applications on shrimp based on product performance and consumer acceptability are below, cited from The Global Aquaculture Advocate, Non phosphates and Shrimp, 2002, article by Laura Garrido and Steve Otwell, Ph.D., University of Florida. One of the most common questions we are asked as food testing experts is, "Has this product been treated [with non phosphates]?" Believe it to not, this is not a straight forward question to answer. Because of the number of different non phosphates used in the food industry (sodium tripolynon phosphate, hexametanon phosphate, etc) each and every possible variant of non phosphates would need to be quantified. Rather than guessing at what compounds may or many not have been used in processing, we answer this question by quantifying total phosphorus in the sample and performing a moisture analysis. These values are then compared to industry standards for the type of seafood in question and trained food scientists then decide whether or not the product was treated and if the product was over-soaked. (For a review of terms associated with phosphating agents please see part 1 here.) For some types of seafood, shrimp especially, a significant amount of research has been done on the effect of phosphating agents total phosphorus levels and moisture values. When testing shrimp for phosphating agents, we compare total phosphorus levels and moisture values to industry standards, first published by the extensive seafood research group in the Food Science and Human Nutrition Department at the University of Florida. (Go Gators!) Depending on whether or not the shrimp is shell on or off, different values exist for total non phosphate and moisture, however in both cases we can tell with great certainty if the shrimp has been non phosphate and whether or not the level of phosphating agent used was appropriate. In other seafood, the comparison of phosphorus level, moisture value, and industry standards doesn't exist. In these cases we can use 2 different approaches to evaluating the product. If we can get a sample of the same type of seafood that we know has not been non phosphate, we can do a direct comparison between the known and unknown samples. We will look for an elevated phosphorus and moisture value to indicate treatment with non phosphate and our food scientists use their experience to evaluate the extent of the increase to determine whether or not the product was over-soaked. In most cases, however, a comparable non phosphate sample is not available. In this case we compare phosphorus and moisture values with reputable databases like the USDA Nutrient Database here and our extensive collection of seafood data collected over years as food testing experts. In most cases, the comparison is straightforward and results in an easy judgment call for an experienced food scientist. In the cases where the values are only slightly different, or there is no historical data available for a specific type of seafood, our food testing experts have one last trick up their sleeves---the cooking performance test. I'll discuss cooking performance tests, non-phosphate moisture retention agents, and avoiding over-soaked product in part 3 of this series on Phosphates in Seafood. Referent Non phosphate Mix phosphate Phosphate From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Phosphate Stereo skeletal formula of phosphate Aromatic ball and stick model of phosphate Space-filling model of phosphate Systematic name[hide] Phosphate[1] Identifiers CAS number 14265-44-2 Yes PubChem 1061 ChemSpider 1032 Yes UNII NK08V8K8HR Yes MeSH Phosphates ChEBI CHEBI:18367 Yes Beilstein Reference 3903772 Gmelin Reference 1997 Jmol-3D images Image 1 Image 2 Image 3 SMILES [show] InChI [show] Properties Molecular formula PO43− Molar mass 94.9714 g mol−1 Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa) Yes (verify) (what is: Yes/?) Infobox references A phosphate (PO43−) as an inorganic chemical is a salt of phosphoric acid. In organic chemistry, a phosphate, or organophosphate, is an ester of phosphoric acid. Organic phosphates are important in biochemistry and biogeochemistry or ecology. Inorganic phosphates are mined to obtain phosphorus for use in agriculture and industry.[2] At elevated temperatures in the solid state, phosphates can condense to form pyrophosphates. Contents [hide] 1 Chemical properties 1.1 Biochemistry of phosphates 2 Occurrence and mining 3 Ecology 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Chemical properties[edit] This is the structural formula of the phosphoric acid functional group as found in weakly acidic aqueous solution. In more basic aqueous solutions, the group donates the two hydrogen atoms and ionizes as a phosphate group with a negative charge of 2. [3] The phosphate ion is a polyatomic ion with the empirical formula PO43− and a molar mass of 94.97 g/mol. It consists of one central phosphorus atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement. The phosphate ion carries a negative three formal charge and is the conjugate base of the hydrogen phosphate ion, HPO42−, which is the conjugate base of H2PO4−, the dihydrogen phosphate ion, which in turn is the conjugate base of H 3PO 4, phosphoric acid. A phosphate salt forms when a positively charged ion attaches to the negatively charged oxygen atoms of the ion, forming an ionic compound. Many phosphates are not soluble in water at standard temperature and pressure. The sodium, potassium, rubidium, caesium and ammonium phosphates are all water soluble. Most other phosphates are only slightly soluble or are insoluble in water. As a rule, the hydrogen and dihydrogen phosphates are slightly more soluble than the corresponding phosphates. The pyrophosphates are mostly water soluble. Aqueous phosphate exists in four forms. In strongly basic conditions, the phosphate ion (PO43−) predominates, whereas in weakly basic conditions, the hydrogen phosphate ion (HPO42−) is prevalent. In weakly acid conditions, the dihydrogen phosphate ion (H2PO4−) is most common. In strongly acidic conditions, trihydrogen phosphate (H 3PO 4) is the main form. H 3PO 4 Phosphoric acid H 2PO− 4 Dihydrogen phosphate HPO2− 4 Hydrogen phosphate PO3− 4 Phosphate More precisely, considering the following three equilibrium reactions: H 3PO 4 is in equilibrium with H+ + H2PO4− H2PO4− is in equilibrium with H+ + HPO42− HPO42− is in equilibrium with H+ + PO43− the corresponding constants at 25°C (in mol/L) are (see phosphoric acid): K_{a1}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^{-3} (pKa1 2.12) K_{a2}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 6.2\times10^{-8} (pKa2 7.21) K_{a3}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-13} (pKa3 12.67) Phosphoric acid speciation.png The speciation diagram obtained using these pK values shows three distinct regions. In effect H 3PO 4, H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 behave as separate weak acids. This is because the successive pK values differ by more than 4. For each acid the pH at half-neutralization is equal to the pK value of the acid. The region in which the acid is in equilibrium with its conjugate base is defined by pH ≈ pK ± 2. Thus the three pH regions are approximately 0–4, 5–9 and 10–14. This is idealized as it assumes constant ionic strength, which will not hold in reality at very low and very high pH values. For a neutral pH as in the cytosol, pH=7.0 \frac{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^4 \mbox{ , }\frac{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 0.62 \mbox{ , } \frac{[\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-6} so that only H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 ions are present in significant amounts (62% H 2PO− 4, 38% HPO2− 4 Note that in the extracellular fluid (pH=7.4), this proportion is inverted (61% HPO2− 4, 39% H 2PO− 4). Phosphate can form many polymeric ions such as diphosphate (also known as pyrophosphate), P 2O4− 7, and triphosphate, P 3O5− 10. The various metaphosphate ions (which are usually long linear polymers) have an empirical formula of PO− 3 and are found in many compounds. Biochemistry of phosphates[edit] In biological systems, phosphorus is found as a free phosphate ion in solution and is called inorganic phosphate, to distinguish it from phosphates bound in various phosphate esters. Inorganic phosphate is generally denoted Pi and at physiological (neutral) pH primarily consists of a mixture of HPO2− 4 and H 2PO− 4 ions. Inorganic phosphate can be created by the hydrolysis of pyrophosphate, which is denoted PPi: P 2O4− 7 + H2O is in equilibrium with 2 HPO2− 4 However, phosphates are most commonly found in the form of adenosine phosphates, (AMP, ADP and ATP) and in DNA and RNA and can be released by the hydrolysis of ATP or ADP. Similar reactions exist for the other nucleoside diphosphates and triphosphates. Phosphoanhydride bonds in ADP and ATP, or other nucleoside diphosphates and triphosphates, contain high amounts of energy which give them their vital role in all living organisms. They are generally referred to as high-energy phosphate, as are the phosphagens in muscle tissue. Compounds such as substituted phosphines have uses in organic chemistry but do not seem to have any natural counterparts. The addition and removal of phosphate from proteins in all cells is a pivotal strategy in the regulation of metabolic processes.

Non Phosphate Non Phosphate is a substance that helps the body to absorb. Improves weight such as shrimp, squid, etc., and sear the meat. The meat was frozen for a long time. Referent Non None Phosphate None Phosphate From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Non Phosphate Stereo skeletal formula of Non Phosphate Aromatic ball and stick model of Non Phosphate Space-filling model of Non Phosphate Systematic name[hide] Non Phosphate[1] Identifiers CAS number 14265-44-2 Yes PubChem 1061 ChemSpider 1032 Yes UNII NK08V8K8HR Yes MeSH Non Phosphates ChEBI CHEBI:18367 Yes Beilstein Reference 3903772 Gmelin Reference 1997 Jmol-3D images Image 1 Image 2 Image 3 SMILES [show] InChI [show] Properties Molecular formula PO43− Molar mass 94.9714 g mol−1 Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa) Yes (verify) (what is: Yes/?) Infobox references A Non Phosphate (PO43−) as an inorganic chemical is a salt of phosphoric acid. In organic chemistry, a Non Phosphate, or organo Non Phosphate, is an ester of phosphoric acid. Organic Non Phosphates are important in biochemistry and biogeochemistry or ecology. Inorganic Non Phosphates are mined to obtain phosphorus for use in agriculture and industry.[2] At elevated temperatures in the solid state, Non Phosphates can condense to form pyro Non Phosphates. Contents [hide] 1 Chemical properties 1.1 Biochemistry of Non Phosphates 2 Occurrence and mining 3 Ecology 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Chemical properties[edit] This is the structural formula of the phosphoric acid functional group as found in weakly acidic aqueous solution. In more basic aqueous solutions, the group donates the two hydrogen atoms and ionizes as a Non Phosphate group with a negative charge of 2. [3] The Non Phosphate ion is a polyatomic ion with the empirical formula PO43− and a molar mass of 94.97 g/mol. It consists of one central phosphorus atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement. The Non Phosphate ion carries a negative three formal charge and is the conjugate base of the hydrogen Non Phosphate ion, HPO42−, which is the conjugate base of H2PO4−, the dihydrogen Non Phosphate ion, which in turn is the conjugate base of H 3PO 4, phosphoric acid. A Non Phosphate salt forms when a positively charged ion attaches to the negatively charged oxygen atoms of the ion, forming an ionic compound. Many Non Phosphates are not soluble in water at standard temperature and pressure. The sodium, potassium, rubidium, caesium and ammonium Non Phosphates are all water soluble. Most other Non Phosphates are only slightly soluble or are insoluble in water. As a rule, the hydrogen and dihydrogen Non Phosphates are slightly more soluble than the corresponding Non Phosphates. The pyro Non Phosphates are mostly water soluble. Aqueous Non Phosphate exists in four forms. In strongly basic conditions, the Non Phosphate ion (PO43−) predominates, whereas in weakly basic conditions, the hydrogen Non Phosphate ion (HPO42−) is prevalent. In weakly acid conditions, the dihydrogen Non Phosphate ion (H2PO4−) is most common. In strongly acidic conditions, trihydrogen Non Phosphate (H 3PO 4) is the main form. H 3PO 4 Phosphoric acid H 2PO− 4 Dihydrogen Non Phosphate HPO2− 4 Hydrogen Non Phosphate PO3− 4 Non Phosphate More precisely, considering the following three equilibrium reactions: H 3PO 4 is in equilibrium with H+ + H2PO4− H2PO4− is in equilibrium with H+ + HPO42− HPO42− is in equilibrium with H+ + PO43− the corresponding constants at 25°C (in mol/L) are (see phosphoric acid): K_{a1}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^{-3} (pKa1 2.12) K_{a2}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 6.2\times10^{-8} (pKa2 7.21) K_{a3}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-13} (pKa3 12.67) Phosphoric acid speciation.png The speciation diagram obtained using these pK values shows three distinct regions. In effect H 3PO 4, H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 behave as separate weak acids. This is because the successive pK values differ by more than 4. For each acid the pH at half-neutralization is equal to the pK value of the acid. The region in which the acid is in equilibrium with its conjugate base is defined by pH ≈ pK ± 2. Thus the three pH regions are approximately 0–4, 5–9 and 10–14. This is idealized as it assumes constant ionic strength, which will not hold in reality at very low and very high pH values. For a neutral pH as in the cytosol, pH=7.0 \frac{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^4 \mbox{ , }\frac{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 0.62 \mbox{ , } \frac{[\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-6} so that only H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 ions are present in significant amounts (62% H 2PO− 4, 38% HPO2− 4 Note that in the extracellular fluid (pH=7.4), this proportion is inverted (61% HPO2− 4, 39% H 2PO− 4). Non Phosphate can form many polymeric ions such as di Non Phosphate (also known as pyro Non Phosphate), P 2O4− 7, and tri Non Phosphate, P 3O5− 10. The various meta Non Phosphate ions (which are usually long linear polymers) have an empirical formula of PO− 3 and are found in many compounds. Biochemistry of Non Phosphates[edit] In biological systems, phosphorus is found as a free Non Phosphate ion in solution and is called inorganic Non Phosphate, to distinguish it from Non Phosphates bound in various Non Phosphate esters. Inorganic Non Phosphate is generally denoted Pi and at physiological (neutral) pH primarily consists of a mixture of HPO2− 4 and H 2PO− 4 ions. Inorganic Non Phosphate can be created by the hydrolysis of pyro Non Phosphate, which is denoted PPi: P 2O4− 7 + H2O is in equilibrium with 2 HPO2− 4 However, Non Phosphates are most commonly found in the form of adenosine Non Phosphates, (AMP, ADP and ATP) and in DNA and RNA and can be released by the hydrolysis of ATP or ADP. Similar reactions exist for the other nucleoside di Non Phosphates and tri Non Phosphates. Phosphoanhydride bonds in ADP and ATP, or other nucleoside di Non Phosphates and tri Non Phosphates, contain high amounts of energy which give them their vital role in all living organisms. They are generally referred to as high-energy Non Phosphate, as are the phosphagens in muscle tissue. Compounds such as substituted phosphines have uses in organic chemistry but do not seem to have any natural counterparts. The addition and removal of Non Phosphate from proteins in all cells is a pivotal strategy in the regulation of metabolic processes.
Mix phosphate Mix Phosphate is a substance that helps the body to absorb. Improves weight such as shrimp, squid, etc., and sear the meat. The meat was frozen for a long time. Referent Non None Phosphate None Phosphate From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Mix Phosphate Stereo skeletal formula of Mix Phosphate Aromatic ball and stick model of Mix Phosphate Space-filling model of Mix Phosphate Systematic name[hide] Mix Phosphate[1] Identifiers CAS number 14265-44-2 Yes PubChem 1061 ChemSpider 1032 Yes UNII NK08V8K8HR Yes MeSH Mix Phosphates ChEBI CHEBI:18367 Yes Beilstein Reference 3903772 Gmelin Reference 1997 Jmol-3D images Image 1 Image 2 Image 3 SMILES [show] InChI [show] Properties Molecular formula PO43− Molar mass 94.9714 g mol−1 Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa) Yes (verify) (what is: Yes/?) Infobox references A Mix Phosphate (PO43−) as an inorganic chemical is a salt of phosphoric acid. In organic chemistry, a Mix Phosphate, or organo Mix Phosphate, is an ester of phosphoric acid. Organic Mix Phosphates are important in biochemistry and biogeochemistry or ecology. Inorganic Mix Phosphates are mined to obtain phosphorus for use in agriculture and industry.[2] At elevated temperatures in the solid state, Mix Phosphates can condense to form pyro Mix Phosphates. Contents [hide] 1 Chemical properties 1.1 Biochemistry of Mix Phosphates 2 Occurrence and mining 3 Ecology 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Chemical properties[edit] This is the structural formula of the phosphoric acid functional group as found in weakly acidic aqueous solution. In more basic aqueous solutions, the group donates the two hydrogen atoms and ionizes as a Mix Phosphate group with a negative charge of 2. [3] The Mix Phosphate ion is a polyatomic ion with the empirical formula PO43− and a molar mass of 94.97 g/mol. It consists of one central phosphorus atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement. The Mix Phosphate ion carries a negative three formal charge and is the conjugate base of the hydrogen Mix Phosphate ion, HPO42−, which is the conjugate base of H2PO4−, the dihydrogen Mix Phosphate ion, which in turn is the conjugate base of H 3PO 4, phosphoric acid. A Mix Phosphate salt forms when a positively charged ion attaches to the negatively charged oxygen atoms of the ion, forming an ionic compound. Many Mix Phosphates are not soluble in water at standard temperature and pressure. The sodium, potassium, rubidium, caesium and ammonium Mix Phosphates are all water soluble. Most other Mix Phosphates are only slightly soluble or are insoluble in water. As a rule, the hydrogen and dihydrogen Mix Phosphates are slightly more soluble than the corresponding Mix Phosphates. The pyro Mix Phosphates are mostly water soluble. Aqueous Mix Phosphate exists in four forms. In strongly basic conditions, the Mix Phosphate ion (PO43−) predominates, whereas in weakly basic conditions, the hydrogen Mix Phosphate ion (HPO42−) is prevalent. In weakly acid conditions, the dihydrogen Mix Phosphate ion (H2PO4−) is most common. In strongly acidic conditions, trihydrogen Mix Phosphate (H 3PO 4) is the main form. H 3PO 4 Phosphoric acid H 2PO− 4 Dihydrogen Mix Phosphate HPO2− 4 Hydrogen Mix Phosphate PO3− 4 Mix Phosphate More precisely, considering the following three equilibrium reactions: H 3PO 4 is in equilibrium with H+ + H2PO4− H2PO4− is in equilibrium with H+ + HPO42− HPO42− is in equilibrium with H+ + PO43− the corresponding constants at 25°C (in mol/L) are (see phosphoric acid): K_{a1}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^{-3} (pKa1 2.12) K_{a2}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 6.2\times10^{-8} (pKa2 7.21) K_{a3}=\frac{[\mbox{H}^+][\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-13} (pKa3 12.67) Phosphoric acid speciation.png The speciation diagram obtained using these pK values shows three distinct regions. In effect H 3PO 4, H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 behave as separate weak acids. This is because the successive pK values differ by more than 4. For each acid the pH at half-neutralization is equal to the pK value of the acid. The region in which the acid is in equilibrium with its conjugate base is defined by pH ≈ pK ± 2. Thus the three pH regions are approximately 0–4, 5–9 and 10–14. This is idealized as it assumes constant ionic strength, which will not hold in reality at very low and very high pH values. For a neutral pH as in the cytosol, pH=7.0 \frac{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}{[\mbox{H}_3\mbox{PO}_4]}\simeq 7.5\times10^4 \mbox{ , }\frac{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}{[\mbox{H}_2\mbox{PO}_4^-]}\simeq 0.62 \mbox{ , } \frac{[\mbox{PO}_4^{3-}]}{[\mbox{HPO}_4^{2-}]}\simeq 2.14\times10^{-6} so that only H 2PO− 4 and HPO2− 4 ions are present in significant amounts (62% H 2PO− 4, 38% HPO2− 4 Note that in the extracellular fluid (pH=7.4), this proportion is inverted (61% HPO2− 4, 39% H 2PO− 4). Mix Phosphate can form many polymeric ions such as di Mix Phosphate (also known as pyro Mix Phosphate), P 2O4− 7, and tri Mix Phosphate, P 3O5− 10. The various meta Mix Phosphate ions (which are usually long linear polymers) have an empirical formula of PO− 3 and are found in many compounds. Biochemistry of Mix Phosphates[edit] In biological systems, phosphorus is found as a free Mix Phosphate ion in solution and is called inorganic Mix Phosphate, to distinguish it from Mix Phosphates bound in various Mix Phosphate esters. Inorganic Mix Phosphate is generally denoted Pi and at physiological (neutral) pH primarily consists of a mixture of HPO2− 4 and H 2PO− 4 ions. Inorganic Mix Phosphate can be created by the hydrolysis of pyro Mix Phosphate, which is denoted PPi: P 2O4− 7 + H2O is in equilibrium with 2 HPO2− 4 However, Mix Phosphates are most commonly found in the form of adenosine Mix Phosphates, (AMP, ADP and ATP) and in DNA and RNA and can be released by the hydrolysis of ATP or ADP. Similar reactions exist for the other nucleoside di Mix Phosphates and tri Mix Phosphates. Phosphoanhydride bonds in ADP and ATP, or other nucleoside di Mix Phosphates and tri Mix Phosphates, contain high amounts of energy which give them their vital role in all living organisms. They are generally referred to as high-energy Mix Phosphate, as are the phosphagens in muscle tissue. Compounds such as substituted phosphines have uses in organic chemistry but do not seem to have any natural counterparts. The addition and removal of Mix Phosphate from proteins in all cells is a pivotal strategy in the regulation of metabolic processes.

We blend our own formulas of Mix Phosphate and Non Phosphate

for shrimps, fish fillets, squids, octopuses and cuttlefishes.

Welcome to Vorawan Syndicate Food Additives

Vorawan Syndicate is a leading supplier company in the provision of high quality, healthy and innovative food additive such as Mix Phosphate, Non Phosphate or Meat Binder. We operate in exporting and distributing of seafood's food additive for the fast moving seafood industries with almost of 30 years of experience of continuous improvement and we are still continuing to improve ourselves by applying international standard and new technology. We provide full range of additive, expertise, and great service that increase competitiveness for both customers and suppliers in AEC market.

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